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Showing posts from November, 2012

Disruptive or Not

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Occasionally, I'm asked how I define a 'Disruptive Technology' and the answer isn't always as straight forward as one might think.

It's easy to say, that it's the introduction of a new technology that changes the way we do business or represents a sudden evolutionary leap forward in a social, technical or informational sense.

In the past, it was easy to point at the steam engine the electric light, the telegraph, television or the Internet and describe them as 'disruptive' without any shadow of a doubt. Today it's a little more complex for several reasons.

Take 'Twitter' for example. Is it disruptive? After all, if you look at its impact on the Arab Spring and the libel laws in the UK, it's certainly having a disruptive effect.

What about Apple's iPod, iPhone or iPad? All of these individually and in concert represent an evolutionary step forward in the computing and software industry, not least of all the iPad, which in the space o…

The Lesson of Ludd

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Two hundred years ago, in 1812, there was a strike at the Rawfolds Mill in Yorkshire. Today, we know know it as the first defeat of the machine-breaking Luddite Movement, a contemporary reaction to the first wave of disruptive technology that marked the start of the Industrial Revolution and a period of history which may hold lessons for us today, in a period of great economic uncertainty, where productivity is increasingly automated and removed from human labour.

Simply taking a moribund Europe and a struggling United States economy, as examples, every statistic of the last decade warns of trouble ahead, as the rapidly climbing curve of automation and intelligent computing overtakes the millions of individual that make-up the traditional workforce.

Some fundamental jobs requiring manual labour and human skills remain irreplaceable in a service economy but huge swathes of knowledge-based careers are rapidly disappearing into cyberspace or to the digital sweat-shops of the Far East, l…

A Rough Tech's Guide to Istanbul

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Several days in Istanbul last week woke me up to the fact that Apple's iPad is not only pervasive and disruptive technology but it's increasingly ubiquitous as well. Only a matter of two years into to its production cycle as a piece of commodity electronics, it shows us the shape of things to come.

Aside from watching other tourists wandering around with their iPads held up in front of them, using its camera to take photographs of Istanbul's magnificent historical sites, my own served two specific purposes.

The first of these was having several guidebook 'apps' and interactive sites, pre-loaded with city maps. Wave goodbye to maps and guide-books, which must be a financial blow to the small army of hawkers outside Hagia Sophia, trying to make a few Turkish Lira, selling both.

There was real comfort being able to explore the old quarter of Istanbul, without any chance of becoming lost. The GPS on my iPad and my iPhone not only gave me an exact position on the city …