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Up and Away

It really is quite restful, not 'Blogging' as much as I have done. There is a danger that weblogs, much like the rest of the internet, can become obsessive and giving it a rest for a while is not such a bad thing, as one re-discovers other interests in the real world. Being published in hard copy is also a little more productive and has a much greater reach than waiting for the occasional weblog visitor to chance upon my rambling thoughts.

From my own point of view, this has been an important week in my life, with the publication of my last CAA exam results. I had worried about navigation; I consider myself pretty useless at math but was pleasantly surprised at the result I achieved, when I was only praying for a simple 75% pass. I wasn't convinced I would get that either.

So now, I have fifteen hours preparation in a complex aircraft to do and then its a sweaty ride with a CAA examiner. Perhaps then, I can have my life back after almost a year and a half of exam stress, gettimg my multi-engine rating and intense study of subjects such as engineering and aerodynamics.

Perhaps I can expand the growing aviation business further? I'm looking to balance the conference circuit with the busy seasonal aerial advertising, my local political role and perhaps some commercial charter work in larger aircraft. The next big up and coming challenge may be the very expensive 'Instrument rating' . Given the extortionate cost of fuel in this country, it's cheaper to do this at an approved centre in one of the JAA states, such as Spain but whether I can find the time to leave the country for a month or so is another question entirely.

Anyway, I'm sure it will be an interesting year ahead and there's Milan next month for a lecture I have to give on ecrime and online espionage, with Talinn, in Estonia a couple of weeks later.

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