BBC Television License - No Place in a Modern Society

Let me make sure I have this right. In our so-called civilized society, each year, an average of forty women the majority single parents on income support - are jailed for non-payment of their BBC television license.



I'm appalled, even sickened that all of the countries in the world, only Britain demands a license to watch television and subsidizes the bloated existence of a single broadcaster, the BBC, the company responsible for a constant diet of sub-standard programming thinly disguised as entertainment and a channel I rarely watch in the interests of good taste.

Of course, if a diet of politically correct, left-wing propaganda and Australian soap operas, Kilroy, East Enders and Holby City is what you understand as television, then the BBC is for you. Then there's gardening and cooking or gardeners in helicopters or gardening chefs at antique auctions and maybe I forgot Nigella, or Jamie Oliver or Ainsley or the Antiques Roadshow, all for £116 a year, a bargain I'm sure.

Apparently, 398,000 households are caught without their TV license each year by a licensing authority that is only second to The Inland Revenue and Customs & Excise, in its powers. This is criminal and outrageous, not the people who don't pay and often can't afford to pay for the license but the Government that continues to support a 'Television Tax' in addition to all the others that our society now has to pay.

It's time to kick out the TV license and let common sense prevail. We don't need to have every household in the United Kingdom paying £116 a year to support the World Service or a BBC web site that reportedly cost £80 million. It's illogical, it's unecessary and its far from democratic and nobody should ever be jailed for refusal or inability to pay for a television license. These are the legal values of a 19th century where a child could be jailed for stealing a loaf of bread and have no place in the Britain of the 21st century.

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